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Compotting Certain Tolumnia Species
 
 
 
Text and Photos by Troy C. Meyers
 
 

Some Tolumnia species have a difficult growth habit. They don't get big in the flask, instead they develop long, daisy-chained, small plants. This might actually be the normal in the wild, some in the genus start in the earth and make chains up onto twigs on shrubs until they get established there.

For Tolumnias like these, I plunk the whole tangle of plants on top of a pot filled with nothing but large sponge rock (large chunky perlite). Just sit them on top, don't try to bury them. They should get watered/fertilized more-or-less daily. Below is a photo of one such pot so you can see what to expect. These plants were unflasked 9 months prior to the photo. The plants have grown a lot, and at this point I would untangle individuals.

 
     
 
Tolumnia Compot
 
 
Tolumnia Compot, a Group of Siblings Sitting on Perlite
 
 
 
 
 

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